New Report: Iraq’s High Commission for Human Rights: Bylaws, Regulations and Legal Framework

October 20, 2012 at 4:00 pm | Posted in Turkmens | Leave a comment
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Institute for International Law and Human Rights’ Report: Iraq’s High Commission for Human Rights: Bylaws, Regulations and Legal Framework

The Institute for International Law and Human Rights’ most recent report, Iraq’s High Commission for Human Rights: Bylaws, Regulations and Legal Framework, has just been posted to the Institute for International Law and Human Rights’ website.

You can download the document in Arabic or English at  http://www.iilhr.org

Iraq’s High Commission for Human Rights: Bylaws, Regulations, and Legal Framework starts with international standards and the Commission’s enabling legislation as a framework, and then considers over 30 country examples to support developing an infrastructure, rules of procedure, complaints handling regulations, financial and procurement regulations, staffing regulations, codes of conduct, and a host of other issues.

The toolkit is organized by topic and each section considers the current legal framework as well as country examples relating to how each task may be accomplished.  It also includes recommendations, sample regulations, and possible procedures tailored to the new Commission for stakeholders to consider.

IILHR Legal Advisor Erin Houlihan served as Project Coordinator for this report, conducting research and managing the writing, editing, and compilation of this report.  Countless hours of research, analysis, and writing was also provided by law students in the University of Virginia School of Law’s Human Rights Program and Duke University School of Law’s Human Rights Advocacy Clinic.

Though there is extensive research on national human rights institutions, much of it is theoretical and specific comparative examples are seriously lacking.  IILHR developed this book over the last two years to fill that research gap and provide tangible examples for consideration that can be used not only by the Iraqi Commission, but also by other national human rights institutions worldwide.

 

ABOUT THE REPORT

This report considers the internal regulatory needs of the Iraqi High Commission for Human Rights, including organizational infrastructure, the development of internal procedures and protocols for the performance of daily work, mechanisms for coordinating with other institutions and organizations, financial management, administration and record-keeping, and human resources policies. Law 53 of 2008 establishing the High Commission for Human Rights serves as the foundation for analysis and recommendations. The report also utilizes the Paris Principles and international best practices where applicable.

This report and its recommendations do not strive to present a “Western” viewpoint for Iraq’s independent human rights commission, nor does it purport to suggest a single “best” vision for the Commission’s functioning. Rather, the report considers the positive and negative experiences of over 30 national human rights institutions from a variety of nations throughout the world, with an eye to the particular situation of Iraq and the legal framework underpinning the institution.

For the purposes of this report, the jurisdiction and authorities of the High Commission for Human Rights are construed in the broadest possible sense within the scope of Law 53 of 2008 and the principles of transparency, independence, and efficiency laid out in the Paris Principles. While Law 53 may imbue the Human Rights Commission with certain authorities, the mechanics guiding the implementation of these authorities requires due consideration.

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