Dealing with a Rising Power: Turkey’s Transformation and its Implications for the EU

October 5, 2012 at 5:40 am | Posted in Turkmens | Leave a comment
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 http://www.silkroadstudies.org/new/docs/publications/1210CES-Turkey.pdf

The European Union and Turkey have a long-standing

and complicated relationship. Turkey became an associate

member of the EU’s predecessor, the European Economic

Community, in 1963 and applied for full membership in

1987. After signing a Customs Union agreement with the

EU in 1995, Turkey was granted candidate status in 1999.

Although membership negotiations began in 2005, they have

recently ground to a halt. At the time of writing, March 2012,

18 areas of negotiation, or chapters, have been blocked. Of

these, the EU has completely frozen eight because Turkey

has not ratified a customs agreement with the EU and is

barring traffic from the Republic of Cyprus to its ports and

airports. Both German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Former

French President Nicolas Sarkozy have called for Turkey to

have a privileged partnership with the EU, rather than full

membership.

Debates on the desirability of Turkey’s accession have

been held against a backdrop of the country’s rapid

economic growth—a 9% rise in GDP in 2010 has made

Turkey the world’s fifteenth largest economy—and its

growing assertiveness on the international stage.

In order to explore the complexity of the EU–Turkey

relationship at the beginning of the second decade of the

twenty-first century, the Centre for European Studies (CES)

has commissioned authors Svante Cornell and Gerald Knaus

to provide their views of recent developments in Turkey and

its position vis-à-vis the EU and countries in the Middle East.

In addition, the CES asked Manfred Scheich to provide a

brief commentary on European and Turkish identities.

Executive Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Turkey’s Accession and The EU’s Role in the World . . . 12

Turkey’s Transformation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

The AKP’s Undulations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

The Opposition’s Decline – and Rebirth?. . . . . . . . . . 29

Turkey’s Foreign Policy under the AKP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

The AKP and “Strategic Depth”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

From Mediating to Taking Sides, 2007-2010. . . . . . . 36

Making Sense of the Foreign Policy Shift:

Pragmatism, Overextension and Ideology. . . . . . . . . 42

The Collapse of “Zero Problems”: Towards a

Reassessment? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Conclusions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

  

http://www.silkroadstudies.org/new/docs/publications/1210CES-Turkey.pdf

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